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Elaine Lemm

Porridge - The Breakfast Super Food.

By October 4, 2008

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A bowl of warm Scottish Porridge

Where did the summer go, and those warm, sunny mornings? I dont know but today not only is it dark outside it is chilly and damp - yuk. So it's time to reach for the saucepan and warm up the mornings with a bowl of warm and nourishing porridge.

As a child it was our breakfast every day, it lined our tummies to sustain us till lunchtime and kept us warm. Back then it was 'uncool', we would rather have had sweet, sugar laden cereals straight from the box and a fight over the free plastic toy.

Porridge has now been elevated to a Super Food with the health benefits making it the must-have breakfast of the noughties; if they were writing Popeye today I think he would be devouring porridge not spinach. It helps lower cholesterol, is a great source of nutrients and protein and fiber and even has some cancer-prevention properties.

Making porridge is quick and easy. There are various brands of instant porridge available in the shops but beware, many are laden with sugar; those without make a great breakfast if you are in a hurry. But, as cooking takes no longer than 7 minutes, it can be made while boiling the kettle for tea and setting the table. You can of course make it the night before and simply warm up at breakfast time. So no excuses for not having a healthy and sustaining breakfast on a cold morning.

Recipe for Porridge

Scottish Porridge Oats

Comments

October 8, 2008 at 4:45 am
(1) Lisa T. says:

I always wondered what porridge was…it’s basically oatmeal. Is that what Oliver wanted when he brazenly went up to the headmaster and asked: “Please, sir, may I have some more?”

October 8, 2008 at 7:03 am
(2) britishfood says:

Unfortunately no for poor Oliver, had it been proper porridge he would have had his poor little tummy filled up. He was fed gruel which, though can sometimes be made with oatmeal rarely was. It was a thin, watery dish made with grain or cereal stirred into water and quite frankly was disgusting …yuk, yuk, yuk.

October 7, 2009 at 11:55 pm
(3) Catlady says:

Porridge was always one of my favourite breakfasts as a child (along with pancakes/flapjacks). Now, as an adult, I will eat it for breakfast, lunch, or supper!!! I still consider it one of the best – a great “comfort food”.

October 8, 2009 at 5:17 am
(4) britishfood says:

I’m with you on this one Catlady, I find porridge so nourishing at any time, especially with fresh fruit or if I am being naughty, a dollop of homemade jam.

October 22, 2010 at 3:33 am
(5) Cage Fighter says:

I eat it every morning with a banana, it sustains my through my morning and stop me from snacking on bad foods if I get hungry mid morning so can stick to my diet better, I also eat it before workouts to get the slow release energy I need. you can pretty much mix it with anything from fruit, chocolate, nuts and seed and whey protien so its good for all the family :) Its the food of champions !! A winners breakfast.

January 20, 2011 at 7:16 am
(6) Zack says:

Hi,

I have read and heard that consuming a mixer of more than 3 grain flours is unhealthy. My porridge at breakfast consists of the following flour mixer: Miller, sorghum, soya, and maize flour. Is my health at risk?

February 9, 2011 at 8:25 am
(7) SID says:

Hi… I have a question… I need to gain weight, can daily taking porridge in breakfast helpful in gaining weight?

October 10, 2012 at 5:20 pm
(8) angel says:

I haue been eatin porridge for breakfast for bout 6yrs.only hauin different wen away on hol..i always haue with it blueberrys &honey &wat makes alot of people question me is wen i mention i never cook it.put it in my bowl with lots of milk.people say but u haue to cook it..well i hau.nt never &feel really good on it.as a.one else haue this mad crauin as i still get every mor 4my porridge. blueberries and honey.

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